Daniel Swingley

Professor
Department Chair
AB, Cognitive Science, Brown University and Queen's College Oxford;
Ph.D., Psychology, Stanford University
Office Location: 
Room 362, Levin Building, 425 S. University Ave.
Phone: 
215-898-0334
Research Interests: 
Developmental Psychology
Language and Communication
Memory and Learning
Perception
 
Specific Research Areas: 

Word recognition, word learning, and lexical representation in infants and young children

 
Research Synopsis: 
My research focuses on word recognition, word learning, and lexical representation in infants and young children. Current projects include perceptual experiments with infants, statistical and acoustic analyses of infant-directed speech corpora, and perceptual learning studies of adults.
 

Professor Daniel Swingley will be considering new graduate students for admission for Fall 2020.

 
Selected Publications: 

Swingley, D. (2019). Learning phonology from surface distributions, considering Dutch and English vowel duration. Language Learning and Development. 15, (1-18). 10.1080/15475441.2018.156927 

Swingley, D., & Van der Feest, S. (2019). A crosslinguistic examination of toddlers' interpretation of vowel duration. Infancy. 24, 300-317. 10.1111/infa.12280

Swingley, D., & Alarcon, C. (2018). Lexical learning may contribute to phonetic learning in infants: a corpus analysis of maternal Spanish. Cognitive Science, 42, 1618-1641, 10.1111/cogs.12620.

Swingley, D., & Humphrey, C. (2018). Quantitative linguistic predictors of infants' learning of specific English words. Child Development, 89, 1247-1267, 10.1111/cdev.12731. 

Bergelson, E., & Swingley, D. (2018). Young infants' word comprehension given an unfamiliar talker or altered pronunciations.  Child Development. 10.1111/cdev.12888
 
Bergelson, E., & Swingley, D. (in press, 2017). Young infants' word comprehension given an unfamiliar talker or altered pronunciations. Child Development. 10.1111/cdev.12888
 
Adriaans, F., & Swingley, D. (2017). Prosodic exaggeration within infant-directed speech: consequences for vowel learnability. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 141, 3070-3078.
 
Swingley, D., & Humphrey, C. (2017). Quantitative linguistic predictors of infants' learning of specific English words. Child Development, 10.1111/cdev.12731.
 
Swingley, D. (2017). Commentary: The infant's developmental path in phonological acquisition. British Journal of Psychology, 108, 28-30. 10.1111/bjop.12215
 
Swingley, D. (2016). Two-year-olds interpret novel phonological neighbors as familiar words. Developmental Psychology, doi 10.1037/dev0000114, 52, 1011-1023.
 
Dautriche, I., Swingley, D., & Christophe, A. (2015). Learning novel phonological neighbors: syntactic category matters. Cognition, doi 10.1016/j.bcognition.2015.06.003
 
Bergelson, E., & Swingley, D. (2013). The acquisition of abstract words by young infants. Cognition, 127, 391-397.
 
Bergelson, E., & Swingley, D. (Feb. 2012). At 6 to 9 months, human infants know the meanings of many common nouns. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 109, 3253-3258.

 

Courses Taught: 

PSYC 001 Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 281 Cognitive Development (undergraduate)
PSYC 399 Individual Empirical Research
PSYC 481 Special Topics in Development (Language acquisition)
PSYC 600 Cognitive Development (graduate)

Appointments: 
Linguistics Graduate Group
 
Advisees: 
Angelica Buerkin-Salgado [Psychology Graduate Student]