Courses for Spring 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
PSYC 001-001 INTRO TO EXP PSYCH CONNOLLY, CAROLINE TR 1030AM-1200PM This course provides an introduction to the basic topics of psychology including our three major areas of distribution: the biological basis of behavior, the cognitive basis of behavior, and individual and group bases of behavior. Topics include, but are not limited to, neuropsychology, learning, cognition, development, disorder, personality, and social psychology.
    Living World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; LIVING WORLD SECTOR
    PSYC 109-401 INTRO TO BRAIN & BEHAV MCGURK, JULIE TR 0130PM-0300PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system, including the physiological bases of sensory activity, perception, drive, motor control and higher mental processes. The course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior. Familiarity with elementary physics and chemistry will be helpful.
      Living World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; LIVING WORLD SECTOR
      PSYC 109-402 LABORATORY T 0900AM-1030AM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system, including the physiological bases of sensory activity, perception, drive, motor control and higher mental processes. The course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior. Familiarity with elementary physics and chemistry will be helpful.
        Living World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
        PSYC 149-401 COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE GERSTEIN, HILARY TR 1030AM-1200PM The study of the neural systems that underlie human perception, memory and language; and of the pathological syndromes that result from damage to these systems.
          PSYC 151-401 LANGUAGE AND THOUGHT TRUESWELL, JOHN TR 1200PM-0130PM This course describes current theorizing on how the human mind achieves high-level cognitive processes such as using language, thinking, and reasoning. The course discusses issues such as whether the language ability is unique to humans, whether there is a critical period to the acquisition of a language, the nature of conceptual knowledge, how people perform deductive reasoning and induction, and how linguistic and conceptual knowledge interact.
            PSYC 162-001 ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY RUSCIO, AYELET MF 0200PM-0330PM The concepts of normality, abnormality, and psychopathology; symptom syndromes;theory and research in psychopathology and psychotherapy.
              PSYC 170-001 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY APICELLA, COREN TR 1030AM-1200PM An overview of theories and research across the range of social behavior from intra-individual to the group level including the effects of culture, social environment, and groups on social interaction.
                Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
                PSYC 217-401 VISUAL NEUROSCIENCE STOCKER, ALAN MWF 0900AM-1000AM An introduction to the scientific study of vision, with an emphasis on the biological substrate and its relation to behavior. Topics will typically include physiological optics, transduction of light, visual thresholds, color vision, anatomy and physiology of the visual pathways, and the cognitive neuroscience of vision.
                  PSYC 239-401 NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY FLANAGAN-CATO, LORETTA TR 1030AM-1200PM This course is designed to examine the various roles played by the nervous and endocrine systems in controlling both physiological processes and behavior. First, the course will build a foundation in the concepts of neural and endocrine system function. Then we will discuss how these mechanisms form the biological underpinnings of various behaviors and their relevant physiological correlates.
                    PSYC 253-401 JUDGMENT AND DECISIONS ROYZMAN, EDWARD W 0530PM-0830PM Thinking, judgment, and personal and societal decision making, with emphasis on fallacies and biases.
                      COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                      PSYC 281-001 COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT SWINGLEY, DANIEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM What infants and young children come to know about the world, and how they learn it. Topics will include changes in children's thinking, perceptual development, language acquisition, and current theories of cognitive development.
                        PSYC 362-301 RESEARCH EXP ABNORMAL: PSYCHOPATHOLOGY HUNT, MELISSA R 0130PM-0430PM PSYC 362-301 is a two-semester course starting in the Fall. Class size limited to 8 students.
                          COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                          PSYC 370-301 RESEARCH EXP SOCIAL PSYC: SEXUALITY & ATTRACTION ROYZMAN, EDWARD R 0130PM-0430PM In this course students will work in small groups to develop, empirically test, and report on a research question within one of the domains of social psychology. Depending on the nature of the project, students will employ survey,experimental, or observational research methodology, and learn how to to conduct and report the appropriate statistical tests with Excel and/or SPSS (typically, correlations, t-tests, ANOVA and ANCOVA, multiple regression, , factor analysis, and measures of reliability). Class discussions will help students craft their projects, and in-class presentations will provide the opportunity to develop and refine presentation skills. Psychology majors only. Class size is limited to 12 students.
                            COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                            PSYC 400-301 SENIOR HONORS SEM PSYCH BRANNON, ELIZABETH M 0200PM-0500PM Open to senior honors candidates in psychology. A two-semester sequence supporting the preparation of an honors thesis in psychology. Students will present their work in progress and develop skills in written and oral communication of scientific ideas.
                              COMMUNICATION WITHIN THE CURRICULUM; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                              PSYC 434-401 COMP.NEURO.LAB RUST, NICOLE TR 0300PM-0430PM This course will focus on computational neuroscience from the combined perspective of data collection, data analysis, and computational modeling. These issues will be explored through lectures as well as Matlab-based tutorials and exercises. The course requires no prior knowledge of computer programming and a limited math background, but familiarity with some basic statistical concepts will be assumed. The course is an ideal preparation for students interested in participating in a more independent research experience in one of the labs on campus. For the Spring 2019 semester, the course will focus on the topic of visual memory.
                                PSYC 447-301 SEMINAR IN NEUROSCIENCE: Neurological Insights into Cognition and Behavior GOTTFRIED, JAY TR 0130PM-0300PM Our modern understanding of the brain began with very humble foundations. Long before transgenic mice, MRI scans, and neuronal recordings, most knowledge about brain function was based on clinical observations of human patients with neurological lesions. This advanced seminar will focus on the cognitive neuroscience of perception, emotion, language, and behavior -- through the unique perspective of real-life patients -- to illustrate fundamental concepts of brain function. Tuesday classes will explore different cognitive neuroscience topics through student presentations and discussion. Thursday classes will involve observing medical history taking and examination of a patient with cognitive deficits pertinent to the Tuesday topic, with opportunity for students to interact with the patient. Pre-requisites: Instructor permission required, PSYC 109/BIBB 109,a statement (up to 300 words) describing your interest in taking this seminar, and an unofficial copy of your transcript. Please send applicaiton materials to Dr. Gottfried, professorradium@gmail.com.
                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                  PSYC 449-301 SEMINAR IN COG NEUROSCI: NEUROSCI FOR POLICYMAKER GERSTEIN, HILARY M 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary each semester. PSYC 449 (Gerstein) Neuroscience for Policymakers: This seminar will provide an overview of the neuroscience behind some of the most relevant issues in public health policy today. We will examine the primary scientific literature as well as delve into lay articles about the science and policy surrounding each issue. /PSYC 449 (Epstein) Consciousness: Consciousness is our subjective experience of the world, including both perceptions and felt internal states. In this seminar, we will explore the the burgeoning scientific literature on the neural basis of consciousness. We will focus in particular on three topics: What are the neuralsystems underlying visual awareness? What are the mechanisms that control the progression of conscious contents to create our stream of thought? What is the relationship between consciousness and behavior? /PSYC 449 (Jenkins) The Social Brain: This seminar examines the cognitive and neural mechanisms that enable humans to predict and understand people's behavior.We will be propelled throughout the course by fundamental questions about the human social brain. For example, why are humans so social? Does the human brain have specialized processes for social thought? Consideration of these questions will involve advanced treatment of a range of topics.
                                    PSYC 449-302 SEMINAR IN COG NEUROSCI: CONSCIOUSNESS EPSTEIN, RUSSELL TR 1200PM-0130PM Topics vary each semester. PSYC 449 (Gerstein) Neuroscience for Policymakers: This seminar will provide an overview of the neuroscience behind some of the most relevant issues in public health policy today. We will examine the primary scientific literature as well as delve into lay articles about the science and policy surrounding each issue. /PSYC 449 (Epstein) Consciousness: Consciousness is our subjective experience of the world, including both perceptions and felt internal states. In this seminar, we will explore the the burgeoning scientific literature on the neural basis of consciousness. We will focus in particular on three topics: What are the neuralsystems underlying visual awareness? What are the mechanisms that control the progression of conscious contents to create our stream of thought? What is the relationship between consciousness and behavior? /PSYC 449 (Jenkins) The Social Brain: This seminar examines the cognitive and neural mechanisms that enable humans to predict and understand people's behavior.We will be propelled throughout the course by fundamental questions about the human social brain. For example, why are humans so social? Does the human brain have specialized processes for social thought? Consideration of these questions will involve advanced treatment of a range of topics.
                                      PSYC 449-303 SEMINAR IN COG NEUROSCI: THE SOCIAL BRAIN JENKINS, ADRIANNA T 0130PM-0430PM Topics vary each semester. PSYC 449 (Gerstein) Neuroscience for Policymakers: This seminar will provide an overview of the neuroscience behind some of the most relevant issues in public health policy today. We will examine the primary scientific literature as well as delve into lay articles about the science and policy surrounding each issue. /PSYC 449 (Epstein) Consciousness: Consciousness is our subjective experience of the world, including both perceptions and felt internal states. In this seminar, we will explore the the burgeoning scientific literature on the neural basis of consciousness. We will focus in particular on three topics: What are the neuralsystems underlying visual awareness? What are the mechanisms that control the progression of conscious contents to create our stream of thought? What is the relationship between consciousness and behavior? /PSYC 449 (Jenkins) The Social Brain: This seminar examines the cognitive and neural mechanisms that enable humans to predict and understand people's behavior.We will be propelled throughout the course by fundamental questions about the human social brain. For example, why are humans so social? Does the human brain have specialized processes for social thought? Consideration of these questions will involve advanced treatment of a range of topics.
                                        PSYC 472-301 SEMINAR EVOLUTION PSYCH: Behavioral Biology of Women APICELLA, COREN T 0300PM-0600PM A course that explores female behavior focusing on evolutionary, physiological,and biosocial aspects of women's lives from puberty, through reproductive processes such as pregnancy, birth, lactation to menopause and old age. Examples are drawn from traditional and modern societies and data from nonhuman primates are also considered.
                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                          PSYC 473-401 NEUROECONOMICS KABLE, JOSEPH MW 0200PM-0330PM This course will review recent research that combines psychological, economic and neuroscientific approaches to study human and animal decision-making. A particular focus will be on how evidence about the neural processes associated with choices might be used to constrain economic and psychological theories of decision-making. Topics covered will include decisions involving risk and uncertainty, reinforcement learning, strategic interactions and games, and social preferences.
                                            PSYC 474-301 SEMINAR CULTURAL PSYCH: Being Human: The Biology of Human Behavior, Cognition, and Culture PLATT, MICHAEL W 0200PM-0500PM
                                              PSYC 482-301 INSIDE THE CRIMINAL MIND WALLER, REBECCA TR 1030AM-1200PM This seminar explores the development of antisocial behavior including psychopathy, aggression, and violence. At its core, this course examines what increases the risk that children will develop behavior problems and go onto more chronic and extreme forms of violence and psychopathic personality that results in harm to others. We will examine psychiatric diagnoses associated with these antisocial behaviors in both childhood and adulthood and how they link to other relevant forms of psychopathology (e.g., substance use, ADHD). We will explore research elucidating the neural correlates of these behaviors, potential genetic mechanisms underlying these behaviors, and the environments that increase risk for these behaviors. Thus, there will be a focus on neurobiology and genetics approaches to psychiatric outcomes, as well as a social science approach to understanding these harmful behaviors, all while considering development across time. We will also consider ethical and moral implications of this research.
                                                PSYC 539-401 THEORETICAL NEUROSCIENCE BALASUBRAMANIAN, VIJAY TR 0900AM-1030AM This course will develop theoretical and computational approaches to structural and functional organization in the brain. The course will cover: (i) the basic biophysics of neural responses, (ii) neural coding and decoding with an emphasis on sensory systems, (iii) approaches to the study of networks of neurons, (iv) models of adaptation, learning and memory, (v) models of decision making, and (vi) ideas that address why the brain is organized the way that it is. The course will be appropriate for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. A knowledge of multi-variable calculus, linear algebra and differential equations is required (except by permission of the instructor). Prior exposure to neuroscience and/or Matlab programming will be helpful.
                                                  PSYC 600-301 SOCIAL BEHVR & BIOLOGY FARAH, MARTHA Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
                                                    PSYC 600-302 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY GOODWIN, GEOFFREY W 1000AM-1200PM Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
                                                      PSYC 600-303 BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE GRILL, HARVEY TR 0130PM-0300PM Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
                                                        PSYC 609-401 SYST & INTEGRAT NEUROSCI PIERCE, ROBERT
                                                        GEFFEN, MARIA
                                                        COHEN, YALE
                                                        MWF 1000AM-1200PM
                                                          PSYC 612-401 INT TO NONP & LOGLIN MOD ROSENBAUM, PAUL TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                                            http://syllabi.wharton.upenn.edu/?term=2009A&course=PSYC612401
                                                            PSYC 671-401 VIOLENCE: CLIN NEURO APP RAINE, ADRIAN TR 1030AM-1200PM Developed for both Psychology and Criminology graduate students, this interdisciplinary course outlines a clinical neuroscience approach to understanding violence in which the tools of neuroscience- neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurocognition, neuroendocrinology, neuropharmacology, molecular and behavioral genetics- are used to help inform the etiology and treatment of violence. Clinical components include psychopathy, proactive and reactive aggression, homicide domestic violence, conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, antisocial personality disorder, crime, and delinquency as well as their comorbid conditions (schizophrenia, drug abuse, hyperactivity). The interaction between social, psychological, and neurobiological processes in predisposing to violence will be highlighted, together with neurodevelopmental perspectives on violence focusing on prospective longitudinal and brain imaging research. Key implications for the criminal justice system, neuroethics, forensics psychology, and intervention will also be outlined.
                                                              PSYC 698-000 LABORATORY ROTATION TBA TBA- Lab rotation for psychology grad students.
                                                                SEE DEPT. FOR SECTION NUMBERS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                PSYC 709-301 DEVELOPMENT & PSYCHOPATH JAFFEE, SARA MW 0100PM-0230PM In this seminar we will survey substantive, methodological and statistical issues that arise in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of empirical inquiries about the effects of psychotherapies. Challenges presented in efforts to disseminate evidence-based clinical practices will also be addressed.
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                  PSYC 815-301 INTRODUCTORY PRACTICUM HUNT, MELISSA TBA TBA-
                                                                    PSYC 820-301 ADVANCED PRACTICUM DERUBEIS, ROBERT TBA TBA- Intensive studies of single individuals including interviews, tests, and experiments; also clinical experience at appropriate community agencies.
                                                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                      PSYC 820-302 ADVANCED PRACTICUM GOLDSTEIN, ALAN TBA TBA- Intensive studies of single individuals including interviews, tests, and experiments; also clinical experience at appropriate community agencies.
                                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                        PSYC 820-303 ADVANCED PRACTICUM HUNT, MELISSA TBA TBA- Intensive studies of single individuals including interviews, tests, and experiments; also clinical experience at appropriate community agencies.
                                                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT