Courses for Spring 2022

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
PSYC 001-001 Intro To Exp Psych Andrew H Ward MW 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course provides an introduction to the basic topics of psychology including our three major areas of distribution: the biological basis of behavior, the cognitive basis of behavior, and individual and group bases of behavior. Topics include, but are not limited to, neuropsychology, learning, cognition, development, disorder, personality, and social psychology. Living World Sector (all classes)
PSYC 005-401 Grit Lab (SNF Paideia Program Course) Angela L Duckworth T 03:30 PM-06:30 PM The aims of Grit Lab are two-fold: (1) equip you with generalizable knowledge about the science of passion and perseverance (2) to help you apply these insights to your own life. At the heart of this course are cutting-edge scientific discoveries about how to foster passion and perseverance for long-term goals. As in any undergraduate course, you will have an opportunity to learn from current research. But unlike most courses, Grit Lab encourages you to apply these ideas to your own life and reflect on your experience. OIDD005401 Designated SNF Paideia Program Course
Registration also required for Recitation (see below)
https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC005401
PSYC 109-401 Intro To Brain & Behav Michael Kane TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system, including the physiological bases of sensory activity, perception, drive, motor control and higher mental processes. The course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior. Familiarity with elementary physics and chemistry will be helpful. BIBB109401, BIOL109401 Living World Sector (all classes) Registration also required for Laboratory (see below) https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC109401
PSYC 109-402 Introduction To Brain and Behavior Michael Kane M 08:30 AM-10:00 AM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system, including the physiological bases of sensory activity, perception, drive, motor control and higher mental processes. The course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior. Familiarity with elementary physics and chemistry will be helpful. BIBB109402, BIOL109402 Living World Sector (all classes) Registration also required for Lecture (see below)
PSYC 149-401 Cognitive Neuroscience Michael Arcaro TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM The study of the neural systems that underlie human perception, memory and language; and of the pathological syndromes that result from damage to these systems. BIBB249401 Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) Natural Science & Math Sector
PSYC 151-401 Language and Thought Delphine Dahan MW 12:00 PM-01:30 PM This course describes current theorizing on how the human mind achieves high-level cognitive processes such as using language, thinking, and reasoning. The course discusses issues such as whether the language ability is unique to humans, whether there is a critical period to the acquisition of a language, the nature of conceptual knowledge, how people perform deductive reasoning and induction, and how linguistic and conceptual knowledge interact. LING151401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC151401
PSYC 162-001 Abnormal Psychology Ayelet M Ruscio MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM The concepts of normality, abnormality, and psychopathology; symptom syndromes;theory and research in psychopathology and psychotherapy.
PSYC 170-001 Social Psychology Coren L Apicella MW 10:15 AM-11:45 AM An overview of theories and research across the range of social behavior from intra-individual to the group level including the effects of culture, social environment, and groups on social interaction. Society sector (all classes)
PSYC 253-001 Judgment and Decisions Edward Royzman W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Thinking, judgment, and personal and societal decision making, with emphasis on fallacies and biases. Prerequisite: One semester of Statistics or Microeconomics.
PSYC 266-001 Intro Positive Psyc (SNF Paideia Program Course) Caroline Jane Connolly TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM An introduction to the study of positive emotions, positive character traits, and positive institutions. The positive emotions consist of emotions about the past (e.g., serenity, satisfaction, pride), about the future (e.g., hope, optimism, faith), and emotions about the present (pleasure and gratification). The distinction among the pleasant life, the good life, and the meaningful life is drawn. The positive traits include wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance, and spirituality, and the classification of these virtues is explored. The positive institutions are exemplified by extended families, free press, humane leadership, and representative government. Designated SNF Paideia Program Course https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC266001
PSYC 266-002 Intro Positive Psych (SNF Paideia Program Course) Caroline Jane Connolly TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM An introduction to the study of positive emotions, positive character traits, and positive institutions. The positive emotions consist of emotions about the past (e.g., serenity, satisfaction, pride), about the future (e.g., hope, optimism, faith), and emotions about the present (pleasure and gratification). The distinction among the pleasant life, the good life, and the meaningful life is drawn. The positive traits include wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance, and spirituality, and the classification of these virtues is explored. The positive institutions are exemplified by extended families, free press, humane leadership, and representative government. Designated SNF Paideia Program Course https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC266002
PSYC 273-001 Neuroeconomics Joseph W Kable TR 03:30 PM-05:00 PM This course will introduce students to neuroeconomics, a field of research that combines economic, psychological, and neuroscientific approaches to study decision-making. The course will focus on our current understanding of how our brains give rise to decisions, and how this knowledge might be used to constrain or advance economic and psychological theories of decision-making. Topics covered will include how individuals make decisions under conditions of uncertainty, how groups of individuals decide to cooperate or compete, and how decisions are shaped by social context, memories, and past experience. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC273001
PSYC 311-301 Research Exp Perception Johannes Burge MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM In this research course, students will begin by first replicating earlier experiments to measure human visual memory capacity. After several class discussions to discuss ideas, each student will design and conduct their own experiment to further investigate visual and/or familiarity memory. Prerequisite: One semester of Statistics, and one of the following: PSYC 111 or 149 or 151 or 217, or permission of instructor. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC311301
PSYC 362-301 Research Exp Abnormal: Psychopathology Melissa G. Hunt R 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Prerequite: PSYC 362, 301 is a two-semester course starting in the Fall. Class size limited to 8 students. Permission Needed From Instructor
Permission Needed From Department
PSYC 370-301 Research Exp Social Psyc: Sexuality & Attraction Edward Royzman R 05:15 PM-08:15 PM In this course students will work in small groups to develop, empirically test, and report on a research question within one of the domains of social psychology. Depending on the nature of the project, students will employ survey,experimental, or observational research methodology, and learn how to to conduct and report the appropriate statistical tests with Excel and/or SPSS (typically, correlations, t-tests, ANOVA and ANCOVA, multiple regression, , factor analysis, and measures of reliability). Class discussions will help students craft their projects, and in-class presentations will provide the opportunity to develop and refine presentation skills. Psychology majors only. Class size is limited to 12 students. Prerequisite: PSYC 170 and one semester of statistics is required. Permission Needed From Department
PSYC 400-301 Senior Honors Sem Psych Elizabeth M Brannon M 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Open to senior honors candidates in psychology. A two-semester sequence supporting the preparation of an honors thesis in psychology. Students will present their work in progress and develop skills in written and oral communication of scientific ideas. Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Honors Program in Psychology. Permission Needed From Department
Communication Within the Curriculum
PSYC 421-401 Neurobiol Learn & Memory Mary Ellen Kelly W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This course focuses on the current state of our knowledge about the neurobiological basis of learning and memory. A combination of lectures and students seminars will explore th emolecular and cellular basis of learning invertebrates and vertebrates from a behavioral and neural perspective. BIOL442401, BIBB442401, NGG575401 https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC421401
PSYC 429-401 Sleep and Memory Anna Schapiro T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Why do we sleep? This question has puzzled scientists for centuries, but one reason emerging from research in the area is that sleep is critical for forming, retaining, and transforming our memories. This seminar explores human and animal research in psychology and neuroscience that has shed light on how sleep carries out these functions. Topics will include the different stages of sleep and their roles in memory consolidation, the neural systems involved in representing memory at different timescales, and the role of dreams in processing memories. BIBB429401
PSYC 435-301 Seminar in Psych Ling Delphine Dahan R 12:00 PM-03:00 PM https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC435301
PSYC 447-301 Seminar in Neuroscience: Neurological Insights Into Cognition and Behavior Jay Gottfried TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Our modern understanding of the brain began with very humble foundations. Long before transgenic mice, MRI scans, and neuronal recordings, most knowledge about brain function was based on clinical observations of human patients with neurological lesions. This advanced seminar will focus on the cognitive neuroscience of perception, emotion, language, and behavior -- through the unique perspective of real-life patients -- to illustrate fundamental concepts of brain function. Tuesday classes will explore different cognitive neuroscience topics through student presentations and discussion. Thursday classes will involve observing medical history taking and examination of a patient with cognitive deficits pertinent to the Tuesday topic, with opportunity for students to interact with the patient. Pre-requisites: Instructor permission required and PSYC 109 OR PSYC 149 OR PSYC 159 Permission Needed From Instructor
Permission Needed From Department
Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
PSYC 449-301 Seminar in Cog Neurosci Sharon L Thompson-Schill R 12:00 PM-03:00 PM Topics vary each semester.
PSYC 470-301 Seminar in Social Psych: the Religious Mind: Embodied, Embedded, and Engaged Gordon Bermant TR 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Topics vary each semester. https://pennintouchdaemon.apps.upenn.edu/pennInTouchProdDaemon/jsp/fast.do?webService=syllabus&term=2022A&course=PSYC470301
PSYC 470-302 Seminar in Social Psych: Moral Psychology Geoffrey Goodwin TR 10:15 AM-11:45 AM Topics vary each semester.
PSYC 472-301 Seminar Evolution Psych Coren L Apicella T 01:45 PM-04:45 PM A course that explores female behavior focusing on evolutionary, physiological,and biosocial aspects of women's lives from puberty, through reproductive processes such as pregnancy, birth, lactation to menopause and old age. Examples are drawn from traditional and modern societies and data from nonhuman primates are also considered.
PSYC 474-301 Seminar Cultural Psych: the Biology of Human Behavior, Cognition, and Culture Michael Louis Platt W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM Prerequisite: Undergraduates only. PSYC 474 and 601 are LPS courses.
PSYC 539-401 Theoretical Neuroscience Vijay Balasubramanian TR 08:30 AM-10:00 AM This course will develop theoretical and computational approaches to structural and functional organization in the brain. The course will cover: (i) the basic biophysics of neural responses, (ii) neural coding and decoding with an emphasis on sensory systems, (iii) approaches to the study of networks of neurons, (iv) models of adaptation, learning and memory, (v) models of decision making, and (vi) ideas that address why the brain is organized the way that it is. The course will be appropriate for advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students. A knowledge of multi-variable calculus, linear algebra and differential equations is required (except by permission of the instructor). Prior exposure to neuroscience and/or Matlab programming will be helpful. BE530401, BIBB585401, NGG594401, PHYS585401 Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) Natural Science & Math Sector
PSYC 547-001 Fndtions Soc Cog Neurosc Martha J. Farah MW 01:45 PM-03:15 PM Permission Needed From Instructor
PSYC 600-301 Proseminar in Psych: Language John C. Trueswell MW 12:00 PM-02:00 PM Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
PSYC 600-302 Proseminar in Psych: Neuroendocrinology Loretta Flanagan-Cato TR 01:45 PM-03:45 PM Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
PSYC 609-401 Neuroscience Core III Maria Geffen
Franz Ludwig Weber
Yale E. Cohen
MWF 10:15 AM-12:15 PM This course provides an introduction to what is known about how neuronal circuits solve problems for the organism and to current resarch approaches to this question. Topics include: vision, audition, olfaction, motor systems, plasticity, and oscillations. In addition, the course aims to provide an overview of the structure of the central nervous system. A number of fundamental concepts are also discussed across topics, such as: lateral inhibition, integration, filterting, frames of reference, error signals, adaptation. The course format consists of lectures, discussions, readings of primary literature, supplemented by textbook chapters and review articles. NGG573401
PSYC 612-401 Int To Nonp & Loglin Mod: Introduction To Non/Semi-Parametric Methods Wei Wang TR 12:00 PM-01:30 PM An applied graduate level course for students who have completed an undergraduate course in basic statistical methods. Covers two unrelated topics: loglinear and logit models for discrete data and nonparametric methods for nonnormal data. Emphasis is on practical methods of data analysis and their interpretation. Primarily for doctoral students in the managerial, behavioral, social and health sciences. Permission of instructor required to enroll. STAT501401 http://syllabi.wharton.upenn.edu/?term=2009A&course=PSYC612401
PSYC 675-401 Language and Cognition Anna Papafragou W 01:45 PM-04:45 PM This is a seminar on how language relates to perception and cognition. The seminar pays particular attention to the question of whether and how language might affect (and be affected by) other mental processes, how different languages represent the mental and physical world, and how children acquire language-general and language-specific ways of encoding human experience. The course incorporates cross-linguistic, cognitive and developmental perspectives on a new and rapidly changing research area. LING675401 Contact Dept Or Instructor For Classrm Info
PSYC 709-301 Development & Psychopath Sara R Jaffee M 12:00 PM-03:00 PM A developmental approach to the study of psychopathology focuses on how psychological processes from normal to abnormal developmental trajectories. In this seminar we will cover theory, methods, and key constructs in the study of developmental psychopathology. Readings will include seminal empirical papers and chapters.
PSYC 747-001 Cont Res Iss in Scan Martha J. Farah W 05:15 PM-08:15 PM Permission Needed From Instructor
PSYC 815-301 Introductory Practicum Melissa G. Hunt
PSYC 820-301 Advanced Practicum Robert J Derubeis Intensive studies of single individuals including interviews, tests, and experiments; also clinical experience at appropriate community agencies. Permission Needed From Department
PSYC 820-302 Advanced Practicum Melissa G. Hunt Intensive studies of single individuals including interviews, tests, and experiments; also clinical experience at appropriate community agencies. Permission Needed From Department