Daniel Swingley

Professor
AB, Cognitive Science, Brown University and Queen's College Oxford;
Ph.D., Psychology, Stanford University
Office Location: 
Room 362, Levin Building, 425 S. University Ave.
Phone: 
215-898-0334
Research Interests: 
Developmental Psychology
Language and Communication
Memory and Learning
Perception
 
Specific Research Areas: 

Word recognition, word learning, and lexical representation in infants and young children

 
Research Synopsis: 
My research focuses on word recognition, word learning, and lexical representation in infants and young children. Current projects include perceptual experiments with infants, statistical and acoustic analyses of infant-directed speech corpora, and perceptual learning studies of adults.
 

Professor Daniel Swingley will be considering new graduate students for admission for Fall 2017.


Selected Publications: 

Swingley, D. (2016). Two-year-olds interpret novel phonological neighbors as familiar words. Developmental Psychology, doi 10.1037/dev0000114, 52, 1011-1023.

Dautriche, I., Swingley, D., & Christophe, A. (2015). Learning novel phonological neighbors: syntactic category matters. Cognition, doi 10.1016/j.bcognition.2015.06.003

Bergelson, E., & Swingley, D. (2013). The acquisition of abstract words by young infants. Cognition, 127, 391-397.

Bergelson, E., & Swingley, D. (Feb. 2012). At 6 to 9 months, human infants know the meanings of many common nouns. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 109, 3253-3258.

Swingley, D. (2012). Cognitive development in language acquisition. Language Learning and Development, 8, 1-3.

Quam, C., & Swingley, D. (2012). Development in children's interpretation of pitch cues to emotions. Child Development, 83, 246-250.

Lupyan, G., & Swingley, D. (2012). Self-directed speech affects visual search performance. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology 65, 1068-1085.

Van der Feest, S. V., & Swingley, D. (2011). Dutch and English listeners' interpretation of vowel duration. JASA Express Letters, 129, EL57-63.

Quam, C., & Swingley, D. (2010). Phonological knowledge guides two-year-olds' and adults' interpretation of salient pitch contours in word learning. Journal of Memory and Language, 62, 135-150.

Swingley, D. (2009). Contributions of infant word learning to language development. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 364, 3617-3622.

Goudbeek, M., Smits, R., & Swingley, D. (2009). Supervised and unsupervised learning of multidimensional auditory categories. JEP:HPP, 35, 1913-1933.

Swingley, D. (2009). Onsets and codas in 1.5-year-olds' word recognition. Journal of Memory and Language, 60, 252-269.

Ramon-Casas, M., Swingley, D., Bosch, L., & Sebastian-Galles, N. (2009). Vowel categorization during word recognition in bilingual toddlers. Cognitive Psychology, 59, 96-121.

Yoshida, K., Fennell, C., Swingley, D., & Werker, J.F. (2009). 14-month-olds learn similar-sounding words. Developmental Science, 12, 412-418

Swingley, D. (2008). The roots of the early vocabulary in infants' learning from speech. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17, 308-312.

Dietrich, C., Swingley, D., & Werker, J.F. (2007). Native language governs interpretation of salient speech sound differences at 18 months. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA, 104, 16027-16031

Swingley, D. (2007). Lexical exposure and word-form encoding in 1.5-year-olds. Developmental Psychology, 43, 454-464.

Swingley, D. & Aslin, R.N. (2007). Lexical competition in young children's word learning. Cognitive Psychology, 54, 99-132.

Swingley, D. (2005). 11-month-olds' knowledge of how familiar words sound. Developmental Science, 8, 432-443.

Swingley, D. (2005). Statistical clustering and the contents of the infant vocabulary. Cognitive Psychology, 50, 86-132.

Courses Taught: 

PSYC 001 Introduction to Psychology
PSYC 281 Cognitive Development (undergraduate)
PSYC 399 Individual Empirical Research
PSYC 481 Special Topics in Development (Language acquisition)
PSYC 600 Cognitive Development (graduate)

Appointments: 
Linguistics Graduate Group
 
Advisees: 
Angelica Buerkin-Salgado [Psychology Graduate Student]