Courses for Fall 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
PSYC 001-001 INTRO TO EXP PSYCH CONNOLLY, CAROLINE MEYERSON HALL B1 TR 0130PM-0300PM This course provides an introduction to the basic topics of psychology including our three major areas of distribution: the biological basis of behavior, the cognitive basis of behavior, and individual and group bases of behavior. Topics include, but are not limited to, neuropsychology, learning, cognition, development, disorder, personality, and social psychology.
    Living World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; LIVING WORLD SECTOR
    PSYC 045-301 THE EMBODIED MIND BERMANT, GORDON CANCELED
      BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR; NURSING MINOR REQUIRED COURSE
      PSYC 097-000 PSYCH ABROAD
        PSYC 109-401 INTRO TO BRAIN & BEHAV MCLEAN, JUDITH STEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING AUD MWF 1000AM-1100AM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system, including the physiological bases of sensory activity, perception, drive, motor control and higher mental processes. The course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior. Familiarity with elementary physics and chemistry will be helpful.
          Living World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; LIVING WORLD SECTOR
          PSYC 109-402 LABORATORY T 0900AM-1030AM Introduction to the structure and function of the vertebrate nervous system, including the physiological bases of sensory activity, perception, drive, motor control and higher mental processes. The course is intended for students interested in the neurobiology of behavior. Familiarity with elementary physics and chemistry will be helpful.
            Living World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
            PSYC 111-401 PERCEPTION BURGE, JOHANNES STEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING AUD TR 0900AM-1030AM How the individual acquires and is guided by knowledge about objects and events in their environment.
              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
              PSYC 127-401 PHYSIOLOGY MOTIVATED BEH GRILL, HARVEY STEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING AUD TR 0130PM-0300PM This course focuses on evaluating the experiments that have sought to establish links between brain structure (the activity of specific brain circuits) and behavioral function (the control of particular motivated and emotional behaviors). Students are exposed to concepts from regulatory physiology, systems neuroscience, pharmacology, and endocrinology and read textbook as well as original source materials. The course focuses on the following behaviors: feeding, sex, fear, anxiety, the appetite for salt, and food aversion. The course also considers the neurochemical control of responses with an eye towards evaluating the development of drug treatments for: obesity, anorexia/cachexia, vomiting, sexual dysfunction, anxiety disorders, and depression.
                PSYC 149-401 COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE MACKEY, ALLYSON STEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING AUD TR 1200PM-0130PM The study of the neural systems that underlie human perception, memory and language; and of the pathological syndromes that result from damage to these systems.
                  PSYC 170-001 SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY WARD, ANDREW LEIDY LAB 10 MW 0330PM-0500PM An overview of theories and research across the range of social behavior from intra-individual to the group level including the effects of culture, social environment, and groups on social interaction.
                    Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
                    PSYC 181-001 INTRO DEVELOPMENTAL PSYC BRANNON, ELIZABETH LEIDY LAB 10 MW 0200PM-0330PM The goal of this course is to introduce both Psychology majors and non-majors majors to the field of Developmental Psychology. Developmental Psychology is a diverse field that studies the changes that occur with age and experience and how we can explain these changes. The field encompasses changes in physicalgrowth, perceptual systems, cognitive systems, social interactions and and much more. We will study the development of perception, cognition, language,academic achievement, emotion regulation, personality, moral reasoning,and attachment. We will review theories of development and ask how these theories explain experimental findings. While the focus is on human development, when relevant, research with animals will be used as a basis for comparison.
                      PSYC 207-401 INTRO COGNITIVE SCIENCE YANG, CHARLES TOWNE BUILDING 100 TR 0130PM-0300PM Cognitive Science is founded on the realization that many problems in the analysis of human and artificial intelligence require an interdisciplinary approach. The course is intended to introduce undergraduates from many areas to the problems and characteristic concepts of Cognitive Science, drawing on formal and empirical approaches from the parent disciplines of computer science, linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy and psychology. The topics covered include Perception, Action, Learning, Language, Knowledge Representation, and Inference, and the relations and interactions between such modules. The course shows how the different views from the parent disciplines interact, and identifies some common themes among the theories that have been proposed. The course pays particular attention to the distinctive role of computation in such theories, and provides an introduction to some of the main directions of current research in the field. It is a requirement for the BA in Cognitive Science, the BAS in Computer and Cognitive Science, and the minor in Cognitive Science, and it is recommended for students taking the dual degree in Computer and Cognitive Science.
                        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; FORMAL REASONING COURSE; FORMAL REASONING
                        PSYC 225-401 DRUGS, BRAIN, AND MIND KANE, MICHAEL ANNENBERG SCHOOL 110 TR 0130PM-0300PM The course will begin with a review of basic concepts in pharmacology: routes of drug administration, drug metabolism, the dose response curve, tolerance, and sensitization. Following a brief overview of cellular foundations of neuropharmacology (cell biology,synaptic and receptor function), the course will focus on various classes of drugs used to treat neuropsychiatric disorders including, among others, depression, schizophrenia,and anxiety. We will additionally consider mechanisms mediating the mind-altering, addictive and neurotoxic effects of abused drugs.
                          PSYC 247-001 NEUROSCIENCE AND SOCIETY GERSTEIN, HILARY LEIDY LAB 109 MW 0330PM-0500PM Cognitive, social,and affective neuroscience have made tremendous progress in in the last two decades. As this progress continues, neuroscience is becoming increasingly relevant to all of the real-world endeavors that require understanding, predicting and changing human behavior. In this course we will examine the ways in which neuroscience is being applied in law, criminal justice, national defense, education, economics, business,and other sectors of society. For each application area we will briefly review those aspects of neuroscience that are most relevant, and then study the application in more detail.
                            PSYC 253-401 JUDGMENT AND DECISIONS ROYZMAN, EDWARD STEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING 111 R 0530PM-0830PM Thinking, judgment, and personal and societal decision making, with emphasis on fallacies and biases.
                              COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                              PSYC 265-401 BEHAVIORAL ECON & PSYCH BHATIA, SUDEEP ANNENBERG SCHOOL 110 TR 1200PM-0130PM This course will introduce you to the study of choice, and will examine in detail what we know about how people make choices, and how we can influence these choices. It will utilize insights from psychology and economics, and will apply these insights to domains including consumer choice, risky decision making, and prosocial decision making.
                                PSYC 266-001 INTRO POSITIVE PSYCH KAUFMAN, SCOTT ANNENBERG SCHOOL 110 M 0200PM-0500PM An introduction to the study of positive emotions, positive character traits, and positive institutions. The positive emotions consist of emotions about the past (e.g., serenity, satisfaction, pride), about the future (e.g., hope, optimism, faith), and emotions about the present (pleasure and gratification). The distinction among the pleasant life, the good life, and the meaningful life is drawn. The positive traits include wisdom, courage, humanity, justice, temperance, and spirituality, and the classification of these virtues is explored. The positive institutions are exemplified by extended families, free press, humane leadership, and representative government.
                                  SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                  PSYC 272-001 EVOLUTIONARY PSYCHOLOGY KURZBAN, ROBERT STEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING AUD TR 1030AM-1200PM This course introduces the field of evolutionary psychology, which is an approach to the study of human behavior. We will consider the threoretical underpinnings of the field, including evolutionary threory, development, kinship, and adaptations for social life, and will sample some of the recent empirical contributions to this growing area.
                                    PSYC 362-301 RESEARCH EXP ABNORMAL: PSYCHOPATHOLOGY HUNT, MELISSA DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3W2 R 0130PM-0430PM PSYC 362-301 is a two-semester course starting in the Fall. Class size limited to 8 students.
                                      COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                      PSYC 400-301 SENIOR HONORS SEM PSYCH KURZBAN, ROBERT
                                      JAFFEE, SARA
                                      GODDARD LAB 102 M 0200PM-0500PM Open to senior honors candidates in psychology. A two-semester sequence supporting the preparation of an honors thesis in psychology. Students will present their work in progress and develop skills in written and oral communication of scientific ideas.
                                        COMMUNICATION WITHIN THE CURRICULUM; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                        PSYC 417-401 VISUAL PROCESSING RUST, NICOLE GODDARD LAB 427 TR 0300PM-0430PM This seminar will focus on how visual information is processed by the eye and the brain to produce visual perception. These issues will be explored through lectures and student presentations of journal articles, combined with Matlab- based tutorials and exercises. The course requires no prior knowledge of visual processing, math, or computer programming.
                                          PSYC 421-401 Neurobiology of Learning and Memory GERSTEIN, HILARY PSYCHOLOGY LAB A30 TR 1030AM-1200PM This advanced course focuses on the current state of our knowledge about neurobiological basis of learning and memory. Students will explore the molecular and cellular basis of learninginvertebrates and vertebrates from a behavioral and neural perspective.
                                            PSYC 429-401 SEMINAR HUMAN MEMORY: Big Data, Memory, and the Human Brain KAHANA, MICHAEL GODDARD LAB 103 TR 1200PM-0130PM Advances in brain recording methods over the last decade have generated vastly more brain data than had been collected by neuroscientists during the previous century. To understand the human brain, scientists must now use computational methods that exploit the power of these huge data sets.This course will introduce you to the use of big data analytics in the study of human memory and its neural basis. Through hands-on programming projects, we will analyze multi-terabyte data sets both to replicate existing phenomena and to make new discoveries. Although the course has no formal neuroscience or psychology prerequisites it does require CIS121 and Python experience. Because of the heavy computing resources required to perform the assignments enrollment is limited to 15 students and there is a required course application. http://psychology.sas.upenn.edu/undergraduate/forms
                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                              PSYC 449-301 SEMINAR IN COG NEUROSCI: CONSCIOUSNESS EPSTEIN, RUSSELL PSYCHOLOGY LAB A30 TR 0300PM-0430PM Topics vary each semester. PSYC 449-301 (Gerstein) Neuroscience for Policymakers: This seminar will provide an overview of the neuroscience behind some of the most relevant issues in public health policy today.Why are clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease treatments so difficult to run and why do so many fail? How does the teenage brain make decisions and who should be considered an adult in court? What is implicit bias and why do we make snap decisions based on mental associations? If you could 'improve' your brain with devices or drugs, should you? We will examine the primary scientific literature as well as delve into lay articles about the science and policy surrounding each issue. A basic understanding of neuroscience and some comfort working with primary literature is assumed.//PSYC 449-302 (Epstein) Consciousness: Consciousness is our subjective experience of the world, including both perceptions and felt internal states. In this seminar, we will explore the the burgeoning scientific literature on the neural basis of consciousness. We will focus in particular on three topics: What are the neuralsystems underlying visual awareness? What are the mechanisms that control the progression of conscious contents to create our stream of thought? What is the relationship between consciousness and behavior?
                                                PSYC 470-301 SEMINAR IN SOCIAL PSYCH: PSYCHOLOGY AND RELIGION BERMANT, GORDON MEYERSON HALL B13 W 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary each semester.
                                                  PSYC 478-401 OBEDIENCE: OBEDIENCE ROYZMAN, EDWARD CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 F 0200PM-0500PM Though almost half a century old, Milgram's 1961-1962 studies of "destructive obedience" continue to puzzle, fascinate, and alarm. In this seminar, we will take an in-depth look at these famous studies (along with the more recent replications) and explore their various psychological, historical, and philosophical ramifications. This course has a number of intellectual goals that go beyond simply rarifying one's understanding of a particular content area (important and generative as it may be). One such a goal is to enable you to think critically (though not disparagingly) about other people's researh and theoretical claims that ensue from it, all with the hope that you can then apply the self-same critical acumen to your own future work. Second, this course will offer a hospitable environment for developing (and exchanging) creative ideas of your own. Your work on your individual reaction papers and on the term paper in particular will be a key element in achieving this goal.
                                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                    PSYC 480-301 SEMINAR DEVELOP PSYCH: PSYCH OF IMAGINATION WEISBERG, DEENA PSYCHOLOGY LAB A30 MW 0200PM-0330PM PSYC 480-301 will examine how the imagination works and how it develops. Students in this course will read and discuss the latest research in this area,learn to analyze empirical articles in cognitive and developmental psychology, and explore the links between imaginative processes and other important cognitive skills.
                                                      PSYC 547-001 FNDTIONS SOC COG NEUROSC FARAH, MARTHA GODDARD LAB 103 MW 0200PM-0330PM
                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                        PSYC 579-301 EXP METHODS PERCEPTION BRAINARD, DAVID GODDARD LAB 103 TR 0330PM-0500PM
                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                          PSYC 600-301 PROSEMINAR IN PSYCH: PSYCHOPATHOLOGY RUSCIO, AYELET GODDARD LAB 102 M 1100AM-0200PM Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
                                                            PSYC 600-302 PROSEMINAR IN PSYCH: SOCIAL EMOTIONAL DEVELOP JAFFEE, SARA GODDARD LAB 102 TR 1030AM-1230PM Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
                                                              PSYC 600-303 PROSEMINAR IN PSYCH: BIOL BASIS OF BEHAVIOR FLANAGAN-CATO, LORETTA PSYCHOLOGY LAB C41 TR 0130PM-0330PM Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
                                                                PSYC 600-304 PROSEMINAR IN PSYCH: COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT SWINGLEY, DANIEL GODDARD LAB 102 TR 1030AM-1230PM Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
                                                                  PSYC 600-402 PROSEMINAR IN PSYCH: NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY FLANAGAN-CATO, LORETTA CANCELED Choice of half or full course units each sem. covering a range of subjects and approaches in academic psychology.
                                                                    PSYC 611-401 STAT FOR PSYCH ROSENBAUM, PAUL JON M. HUNTSMAN HALL 250 TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                      PSYC 698-000 LABORATORY ROTATION Lab rotation for psychology grad students.
                                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                        PSYC 709-301 PSYC ASSESSMENT OF CHILD DINGFELDER, HILARY TBA TBA- In this seminar we will survey substantive, methodological and statistical issues that arise in the planning, conduct, and interpretation of empirical inquiries about the effects of psychotherapies. Challenges presented in efforts to disseminate evidence-based clinical practices will also be addressed.
                                                                          PSYC 711-301 REGRESSION & ANOVA BARNHART, BRENDAN GODDARD LAB 102 T 0630PM-0930PM
                                                                            PSYC 747-001 CONT RES ISS IN SCAN FARAH, MARTHA WILLIAMS HALL 843 W 0500PM-0800PM
                                                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                              PSYC 750-401 NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY LUCKI, IRWIN CANCELED Biological issues relevant to neuropsychiatric illnesses are covered in detail in four sections. The first section covers clinical aspects of major psychiatric disorders and includes some contact with patients. The second section presents the neuroanatomy of the limbic systgem. In the third section, emphasis is on the mechanisms of action of psychotropic drugs, including antidepressants, antipsychotics, anxiolytics, and stimulants. The final section covers information relevant to understanding biological processes that may be abnormal in neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as stress, sleep, and circadian rhythms, as well as quantitative genetics.
                                                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                PSYC 751-301 S/T IN COGNITION TRUESWELL, JOHN CANCELED
                                                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                  PSYC 810-301 PSYCHODIAGNOSTIC TESTING HUNT, MELISSA TBA TBA-
                                                                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                    PSYC 811-301 PSYCHODIAGNOS INTERVIEW HUNT, MELISSA TBA TBA-
                                                                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                      PSYC 815-301 INTRODUCTORY PRACTICUM HUNT, MELISSA CANCELED
                                                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                        PSYC 820-301 ADVANCED PRACTICUM DERUBEIS, ROBERT TBA TBA- Intensive studies of single individuals including interviews, tests, and experiments; also clinical experience at appropriate community agencies.
                                                                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                          PSYC 820-302 ADVANCED PRACTICUM GOLDSTEIN, ALAN TBA TBA- Intensive studies of single individuals including interviews, tests, and experiments; also clinical experience at appropriate community agencies.
                                                                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                            PSYC 820-303 ADVANCED PRACTICUM HUNT, MELISSA TBA TBA- Intensive studies of single individuals including interviews, tests, and experiments; also clinical experience at appropriate community agencies.